Tag Archives: Java

How to implement a chatbot in Java

So we are back on our discussion about chatbots. I will not talk about basics of chatbots that I covered here. I will directly start showing how to implement a chatbot in Java. We are going to use AIML (Artificial Intelligence Markup Language) library for this implementation. This library is opensource and provided by google.

A maven project

As a first step, let’s create a maven project in eclipse with groupId com.betterjavacode and artifactId as chatbot. Once the project is created, we can add ab.jar to project by adding the respective dependency in maven pom.xml  like below:

Google library for AIML provides default AI rules to use to implement chatbot. We will add these rules in resources directory of our project. Copy bots folder from program-ab directory into resources folder.

Chatbot Program

Now we will write the chatbot program which will be part of main method. In simple terms, once we invoke this program through main method, it will be in an infinite loop. An input command will wait for user input and then based on our aiml library chatbot will answer to what an user had input.

Now if we run this program, it will show us input to ask a question to chatbot Mr. Chatter.

Conclusion

In this article, we showed how to add a chatbot. Similarly, we can enhance this program by adding custom patterns that chatbot can respond to.

References

Chatbot Implementation

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Chatbots and more

This is not the regular programming post, but more of a discussion post and where we are heading with our technology. Alexa, Google Home, Cortona and number of personal assistants are available at our perusal. With these kind of products, we are slowly evolving into artificial intelligence driven technology. Lot of manual labor jobs might be in danger in near future. Politics aside, I am more interested to understand this topic from technology and humane perspective. While we still struggle with lot of other ethical issues with existing technology, AI will only create social conundrums.

What I want to discuss in this post, is more about chatbots. You can think this as a scribbling post. I am just bringing some ideas forefront to build a chatbot using java.

What are chatbots?

Chatbots are crude version of personal assistants. Personal assistants help you in many ways, in process saving you time, providing you leisure. Simplest version of these chatbots are those that answer your questions like “What’s the weather like today?”, a chatbot will connect to a weather website to find out today’s weather and then answer you accordingly. Similarly, on a ecommerce site, I can ask a question by typing “Where can I find this book?”, chatbot will answer “In literature and short stories section”. A chatbot can also help build customer support, taking away the traditional customer support people. In more advance version, same chatbots can build a library based on your likings, dislikings, answers and provide more options for lifestyle.

Wikipedia definition says

A chatbot is a computer program that conducts a conversation via auditory or textual methods.

Chatbots are part of Artificial intelligence that has been popularized these days.

Design of chatbots

In this article, we will not be showing any code for chatbots, but we will be building chatbots in next post. This is a post where we bring the idea of chatbot into design. As we discussed the definition of chatbot, we will be building an agent that will chat with us in a natural language that we use for daily communication.

Me: “Hi Mr. Chatbot, how are you today?”

Mr. Chatbot: “I am fine, Mr. Mali. Thank You”

Me: “What’s the day today?”

Mr. Chatbot: “It’s Wednesday today.”

This is an example of conversation how a chatbot would answer. We will build a database which will have natural language processing ability to find out what question has been asked and based on that answer the question as accurately as possible. This chatbot is an experimental build up.

Does it mean it can falter? Glad you ask that, it definitely means it can answer erratic. But it’s ok in our experimentation world, even Google home had his off days.

We will need a chat engine and we will be using plain English to type our messages. We will use AIML (Artificial Intelligence Markup Language) to build this chatbot.

In conclusion, I would provide the implementation of this chatbot in next few posts. We will have more discussion about chatbots in future articles.

 

References

  1. AIML
  2. Chatbot

How to deploy Spring Boot Application on docker – Part IX

What is docker

Docker is a container platform delivered by a company named “Docker Inc.” Docker can be used by developers, operators and enterprise users to deliver and use packaged software. Docker has something called a container. Container can be a virtual machine (VM) in lay man’s terms, but still little different from VM. Container contains packaged software delivered in a way that it can be run isolated on a shared operating system. As per official definition – Unlike VMs, container does not bundle a full operating system – only libraries and settings required to make the software work are needed.

In this demo, we will use our spring boot application built throughout from Part I to Part VIII.

I am using Windows Platform Toolbox for docker to build my docker containers. 

We will build a container with mysql database deployed and another container where we will deploy spring boot application. This spring boot application container will connect to mysql database container at runtime. The process is little complicated, but once you get your hands on docker container, it becomes very straight forward to understand. Also for this post, I will not explain anything about spring boot application. You should review all the previous posts I have written explaining how to build and deploy spring boot application on an embedded tomcat.

Building a docker container with mysql

Few things to remember

  1. Make sure your spring boot application is working with mysql database before you build a container.
  2. If your application contains user administration and password, make sure you have a super administrator whose password you can insert in database with password_hash. This is specifically true for the application we will be deploying in docker container.

For most standard applications (like mysql, java 8, spring-boot), there are number of images available in docker hub. When we will run our docker container for database, docker shell will pull the version of that application from the hub to build a container. We will not be creating any new or blank docker image. To run a docker container with mysql version 5.6, we will use below command.

 

  • Name of our docker container is benefitsmysql.
  • We are not using any password. This is not recommended for production code, I am just doing this for demo purposes.
  • Database name is benefitsmysql.
  • Also this database is running at port 3308 to 3306 of local host machine.
  • -d to tell Docker to daemonize the container and keep it running.
  • mysql:5.6 to download MySQL 5.6 Server image from Docker public repo

Once this is started, there are couple of ways you can verify if we are able to connect to this database or not.

Get the ip address of this container host with command docker-machine ip . Now in mysql administrator workbench, access the mysql server with ip address and port 3308 and see if you can access the database.

Another way on docker shell terminal – use this command docker exec -it benefitsmysql -l , this will connect you as a root to the shell where mysql is installed. And then you can use mysql as regular command to access mysql.

To run our Spring boot application successfully, once you access mysql, create following tables:

 

Building a docker image for Spring Boot Application along with mysql

To dockerize my spring boot application, we will use a maven plugin to build a docker image.

I am passing dockerDirectory where Dockerfile will be stored to build our image. Also another change I have made to my original pom file, is that i have added packaging as jar.

I have also changed in my application.properties to point to mysql database container by updating database url with ipaddress of docker container.

spring.datasource.url=jdbc:mysql://192.168.99.100:3308/benefitsmysql

My Dockerfile to build a docker image is as below:

Basically this will build a Benefits.jar using java 8 and will expose port 8443 that I can use to access my application.

Now build a new docker container image by using maven goal as

mvn clean package docker:build

To run the application

docker run -p 8443:8443 --name benefits --link benefitsmysql:mysql -d containerid

This will execute the jar built within that container. Important to note here is --link as it links other container where we have mysql server deployed. So we are linking two containers and we will call the database from our spring boot application container. The same command can be used little differently to see the detail execution log as below

docker run -p 8443:8443 --name benefits --link benefitsmysql:mysql -it containerid

 

Executing the application

Once the application starts successfully, we will access our application with url https://192.168.99.100:8443/home , this will look like below:

DockerContainerSpringAppLogin

Another note – Make sure to update ip addess in all angular js references.

In this post, we showed how we can deploy Spring boot application connected to mysql on a docker container. Code for this post will be available on github repository here

References

To write my post, I used following references

  1. Docker
  2. Connection refused error
  3. Spring Boot docker

Design Pattern – Prototype Pattern – Part VI

If you want to read about previous posts related to design patterns, series of posts about design patterns are

  1. Introduction to design patterns
  2. Singleton Pattern
  3. Factory Pattern
  4. Abstract Factory Pattern
  5. Builder Pattern

The next post about Prototype design pattern will cover creation design pattern that we have been writing about till now.

When to use Prototype Design Pattern?

Since this is a creational design pattern, this is used when decision is to reduce creation cost of object through standard way. There can be argument about how this is then different from abstract factory pattern. The key benefit of Prototype design pattern is that it optimizes the use case where multiple objects of same type will have mostly same data.

Major example is reading configuration data from a file/database over a network. Also if you want to hide the logic of creating new instance from the client.

How to use Prototype Design Pattern?

In this pattern, there is an interface of Prototype that has method for clone and any concrete class implementing this interface, implements the method to clone the object.


public interface Car {

Car clone();

}

We have an interface Car which we will implement in our concrete classes.


package com.bettterjavacode.designpatterns.prototypeexample;

public class Toyota implements Car {

private final String CARNAME = "Toyota";

public Car clone() {
return new Toyota();
}

@Override
public String toString() {
return CARNAME;
}

}

We will have a factory class that will get us a prototype based on type of object we have passed. This will look like below:


package com.bettterjavacode.designpatterns.prototypeexample;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class CarFactory {

private static final Map<String, Car> prototypes = new HashMap<String, Car>();

static {
prototypes.put("toyota", new Toyota());
prototypes.put("lexus", new Lexus());
prototypes.put("bmw", new BMW());
}

public static Car getPrototype(String type) {
return prototypes.get(type)
.clone();
}
}

Now our demo class will pass the type of car as an argument to print the carname. That will look like below:


package com.betterjavacode.designpatterns;

import com.bettterjavacode.designpatterns.prototypeexample.Car;
import com.bettterjavacode.designpatterns.prototypeexample.CarFactory;

public class PrototypeDemo {

public static void main(String[] args) {
if (args.length > 0) {
for (String type : args) {
Car prototype = CarFactory.getPrototype(type);
if (prototype != null) {
System.out.println(prototype);
}
}
} else {
System.out.println(" Run again with arguments");
}

}

}

Conclusion

In this post, we showed how to use prototype design pattern. The code for this is available here

References

  1. Design Patterns – Prototype
  2. Prototype Pattern

Design Patterns – Builder Pattern – Part V

Continuing the series of posts about design patterns, we will talk about builder pattern in this post. Builder pattern is of type creational design pattern. One of the major uses of Builder pattern is when there are too many constructor parameters to handle.

When to use Builder Pattern?

Builder pattern enforces a step by step approach to create a complex object. The object can not be used till it’s a finished product. It helps to encapsulate complex creation logic. One of the examples from real time is file creation with a format. If you are create a file about certain format (example xml, csv), you can builder pattern to create simple logical approach to creating file.

How to use Builder Pattern?

Lately working on a project to build an EDI file to transfer between customer, I have to create a file of format 834. So 834 file format varies according to different health insurance carrier. This file format contains headers, records and trailers. Headers indicate different paradigm about the file and the customer and who is sending it. To show example of builder pattern, I will use one of the headers of this file format and how it can be created using builder pattern.

One of the headers is called Transactional Group Header. This header looks like below in a real file

ST*834*5432853*005010X220A1~

First field “ST” indicates that it is a transactional group. All the records for one customer can lie between ST and SE. 834 is a transaction code for file format. Since this is 834 file format, code is 834. 5432853 is a unique transaction control number, this can be anything between 4 digits in length to maximum 9 digits in length. 005010X220A1 is a implementation reference number.

Our implementation of the class with have fields for each of these field from header, a private constructor and a static builder class. This is shown below:


public class TransactionalHeader implements Serializable {
private static final long serialVersionUID = 7517644545656169045L;

private String st;

private String transactioncode;

private String transactioncontrolnumber;

private String implementationreference;

public static class Builder {

private String st;

private String transactioncode;

private String transactioncontrolnumber;

private String implementationreference;

public Builder st(String st) {

this.st = st; return this;

}

public Builder transactioncode(String transactioncode) {

this.transactioncode = transactioncode; return this;

}

public Builder transactioncontrolnumber(String transactioncontrolnumber) {                            this.transactioncontrolnumber = transactioncontrolnumber; return this;

}

public Builder implementationreference(String implementationreference) {                                this.implementationreference = implementationreference; return this;

}

public TransactionalHeader build() {

return new TransactionalHeader(this);

}

}

private TransactionalHeader(Builder builder) {

this.st = builder.st;

this.transactioncode = builder.transactioncode;

this.transactioncontrolnumber = builder.transactioncontrolnumber;

this.implementationreference = builder.implementationreference;

}

public String toString() {

String result = "";

StringBuffer sb = new StringBuffer();

sb.append(st);

sb.append(FileUtil.FIELD_SPLITTER);

sb.append(transactioncode);

sb.append(FileUtil.FIELD_SPLITTER);

sb.append(transactioncontrolnumber);

sb.append(FileUtil.FIELD_SPLITTER);

sb.append(implementationreference);

sb.append("~");

result = sb.toString();

return result;

}

}

This was our builder class. Let’s create a demo class that will use this builder class to build an object that will give us transactional header in file. This will look like below:


public String getTransactionalHeader() {

String result = "";

TransactionalHeader th = new TransactionalHeader.Builder()

.st("ST")

.transactioncode(TRANSACTION_IDENTIFIER_CODE)

.transactioncontrolnumber(FileUtil.getTransactionControlNumber())

.implementationreference("005010X220A1").build();

result = th.toString();

return result;

}

In this way, builder design pattern can be used to construct complex objects. One of the easy way to identify when to use this design pattern is when you have more than 4 or more parameters in your constructor.

Code for this post is available to download here.

 

How To: AngularJS User Interface to CRUD Spring Boot REST API

In this post, we will add an user interface using AngularJS to the REST api we created here.

Controller for home page

First we will create a controller in Spring Boot rest api to call our home page. All the requests that will come to web server, will go through this controller and controller will return a home page for the request based on path.

MainController.java will look like below:


package com.betterjavacode.benefits.controller;

import org.apache.logging.log4j.LogManager;
import org.apache.logging.log4j.Logger;
import org.springframework.stereotype.Controller;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMapping;
import org.springframework.web.bind.annotation.RequestMethod;

@Controller
public class MainController {

public static final Logger LOGGER = LogManager.getLogger(MainController.class);

@RequestMapping(value = "/home", method = RequestMethod.GET)
public String homepage() {
LOGGER.info(" Enter >> homepage() ");
return "index";
}
}

Any request coming to https://localhost:8443/home will return a page from index.html.

Create a Home Page

Now, we will create an index.html page. We will also be using angular JS framework as part of this home page so that we can build a single page application. If you are not aware of Angular JS or new to this framework, you can read about it AngularJS. One thing to remember while creating this page is a directory structure. Lot of issues that arise to create html pages are because of directory structure. Directory structure will look like below:

directorystructure

The home page index.html page is under main/resources/templates/ directory and it looks like below


<html ng-app="benefitApp">

<head><meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1" /><title>Benefit Application</title>

<script>document.write('<base href="' + document.location + '" />');</script>

	<link rel="stylesheet" href="/css/bootstrap.css" />

<script src="https://code.angularjs.org/1.6.1/angular.js"></script>

<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/angular.js/1.6.1/angular-route.js"></script>

<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/angular.js/1.6.1/angular-resource.js"></script>

<script type="text/javascript" src="./js/app.js"></script>

</head>

<body ng-controller="MainCtrl">

Hello {{name}}!
<div>
<ul class="menu">
	<li><a href="listUser">user-list</a></li>
	<li><a href="listCompany">company-list</a></li>
</ul>
<div ng-view="ng-view"></div>
</div>
</body></html>

Home page shows that this is an angular app with name “benefitApp”. This also declares a controller “MainCtrl” with an angular view. Important to see we are importing angular.js, angular-route.js and angular-resource.js modules. Click on user-list or company-list, will show list of users and list of companies respectively.

Create a controller

Now to handle the controller (MainCtrl), we added in index.html, we will add app.js which will declare the controller. This javascript file also contains config data to handle all the routing of pages. That’s why we will be importing “ngRoute” and “ngResource” angular modules.


var app = angular.module('benefitApp', ['ngRoute','ngResource']);

var app = angular.module('benefitApp', ['ngRoute','ngResource']);
app.controller('MainCtrl', function($scope, $routeParams) {

$scope.name = 'World';

$scope.$routeParams = $routeParams;

})

Through out the interaction on web pages, we will be using different controllers for editing user or company information and creating user or company. The same file app.js will also handle routing of these pages which is shown below


app.config(function($routeProvider,$locationProvider) {

$locationProvider.html5Mode(true);

$routeProvider.when('/listUser',

{templateUrl: 'views/listUser.html', controller: 'userController'});

$routeProvider.when('/listCompany',

{templateUrl: 'views/listCompany.html', controller: 'companyController'});

$routeProvider .when('/editUser/:userId',

{ templateUrl : 'views/editUser.html' }) ;

$routeProvider .when('/editCompany/:companyId',

{ templateUrl : 'views/editCompany.html' }) ;

$routeProvider.when('/createUser',

{templateUrl:'views/createUser.html'});

$routeProvider.when('/createCompany',

{templateUrl:'views/createCompany.html'});

});

Rest of the code showing all controllers’ logic has been skipped for post purposes. It is available on github repository.

UserController or CompanyController are calling rest apis which we have built using Spring boot.

Demo

Now build the code and run our embedded tomcat webserver. Fire up the url https://localhost:8443/home – it will look like below:

homepage

Click on user-list and it will show list of users inside the same page as below:

listofuserspage

Click on edit button and we will see a form to update user information:

edituserpage

Download –

In this post, we showed how to create a simple CRUD user interface using angular JS for Spring Boot REST api. The code for this is available at repository

Design Pattern – Abstract Factory Pattern – Part IV

In the continuation of design pattern series, till now we have covered IntroductionSingleton Pattern and Factory Pattern. In current post, we will cover the next creational type of design pattern and that is Abstract Design Pattern.

So what is abstract factory pattern?

Well, it’s an interface to create families of related or dependent objects without client knowing the implementation details.

Difference between abstract factory pattern and factory pattern

One common theme between these two patterns is that they decouple the client system from implementation details.

  • Factory pattern creates object through inheritance.
  • Abstract factory pattern creates object through composition.
  • Abstract factory provides an interface to create family of related objects.
  • Factory pattern aka factory method pattern is inherited in subclasses to create concrete objects.

In previous post, we saw an interface vehicle, implemented by different classes Car, Bus, Motorcycle, Truck and a class VehicleFactory returned different classes.

Abstract Factory pattern gives a layer of abstraction over regular factory pattern and in the process it isolates factories. The pattern returns factories of related objects. So If I want a car of Toyoto types, it can return me factories of Camry, Corolla, Avalanche etc.

Now to show Abstract Factory pattern, we will create an abstract class which will return car mileage. This will look like below:


public abstract class CarMileage {

protected double distance;
protected double gas;

public abstract void getCarMileage(double dist, double gasfilled);

public void calculateCarMileage(double dist, double gasfilled) {
double carmileage = dist / gasfilled;
System.out.println(" Your car mileage is " + carmileage);
}
}

Now each related concrete class will extend this class to return us car mileage. We will have Camry, Corolla and Avalanche as different car of types Toyota. As part of abstract factory pattern, we will add an abstract class that will return me factories of car mileage. This is shown as below:


public abstract class AbstractFactory {
public abstract CarMileage getCarMileage(String car);
}

A concrete subclass CarFactory of AbstractFactory, will return us different car mileage based on the car name we have passed.


public class CarFactory extends AbstractFactory {

@Override
public CarMileage getCarMileage(String car) {

if (car == null || car.equals("")) {
return null;
}
if (car.equalsIgnoreCase("camry")) {
return new CamryCarMileage();
} else if (car.equalsIgnoreCase("corolla")) {
return new CorollaCarMileage();
} else if (car.equalsIgnoreCase("avalanche")) {
return new AvalanceCarMileage();
}
return null;
}

}

To demo this by implementing a client class which will ask user input for carname, distance covered and gas filled. Based on carname, AbstractFactory will return us a factory for CarMileage. This factory of CarMileage will return us calculated car mileage for that car.


public class AbstractFactoryPatternDemo {

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(System.in));

System.out.println(" Enter the car name you want mileage for: ");

String carname = br.readLine();
System.out.println("\n");
System.out.println("Enter the distance covered: ");

String distanceStr = br.readLine();
double distance = Double.parseDouble(distanceStr);
System.out.println("\n");
System.out.println("Enter the gas you had filled: ");
System.out.println("\n");
String gasStr = br.readLine();
double gas = Double.parseDouble(gasStr);

AbstractFactory af = FactoryCreator.getFactory();
CarMileage cm = af.getCarMileage(carname);

cm.getCarMileage(distance, gas);

}

}

 

In this post, we showed how to use abstract factory pattern when we want to create a family of related objects but without specifying their concrete sub-classes.

Download

The code for this post is available github repo.